Ahrefs: The Definitive Guide

Ahrefs: The Definitive Guide

This is a complete guide to Ahrefs.

In this new guide you’ll learn everything there is to know about this popular SEO tool, including:

  • Key features
  • Real-life use cases
  • Advanced tips
  • How Ahrefs compares to similar SEO Tools (like SEMrush)
  • Lots more

So if you want to get the most out of Ahrefs, this guide is for you.

Let’s jump right in.

Ahrefs – The definitive guide

Chapter 1: Intro to Ahrefs

Chapter – Intro to Ahrefs

What is Ahrefs?

Ahrefs is an SEO software suite that contains tools for link building, keyword research, competitor analysis, rank tracking and site audits. Most of the features inside of Ahrefs are designed for marketing professionals.

In short: Ahrefs is a popular SEO tool that people use to get higher Google rankings.

What is Ahrefs Used For?

Ahrefs is mainly used to analyze a website’s link profile, keyword rankings, and SEO health.

Ahrefs – Backlinko overview

You can also use Ahrefs to conduct keyword research for Google, YouTube, and Amazon.

Ahrefs – Keywords explorer

And many people use Ahrefs to find content that’s performed well (in terms of social shares and/or links) on a given topic.

Ahrefs – Content explorer

When Ahrefs first launched in 2011, it was mainly a tool to analyze a site’s backlinks.

Ahrefs – Old homepage

And its feature set has grown A LOT over the years. In fact, I’ve been an Ahrefs customer since 2013.

Ahrefs – Backlinko account history

Over that time I’ve seen Ahrefs grow from a link analysis tool into a fully-featured SEO suite that now competes head-to-head against Moz Pro and SEMrush.

Today, Ahrefs is mostly used by:

  • Small business owners that do SEO for their own websites
  • SEO agencies that work with multiple clients
  • “In house” marketers that run marketing for their employer’s site
  • Affiliate marketers that run several different sites
  • SEO consultants that advise clients on their SEO strategy

How Much Is Ahrefs?

Ahrefs’ pricing depends on the plan that you choose. And whether you go with monthly or annual billing.

Here’s a breakdown of Ahrefs pricing.

Ahrefs pricing table

While Ahrefs doesn’t currently offer a free trial, they do have a 7-day trial for $7.

Is Ahrefs Better Than SEMrush?

I recently wrote a review that compared Ahrefs vs. SEMrush.

Backlinko – Ahrefs vs. SEMrush post

So if you want a deep dive into how these tools compare, I recommend checking that out.

But the short answer is that I prefer Ahrefs over SEMrush. Both tools are excellent (in fact, I subscribe to both). But I like Ahrefs’ UX a lot more. Otherwise, the tools are very similar.

With that, here’s a quick breakdown of how Ahrefs compares to SEMrush:

Ahrefs and SEMrush compared

To be clear: this guide isn’t an Ahrefs review. But a lot of people ask me if I like Ahrefs or SEMrush. So I wanted to quickly answer that here.

Chapter 2: Ahrefs Terms and Metrics

Chapter – Ahrefs terms and metrics

If you use Ahrefs for more than 30 seconds, you’ll notice that the tool contains A LOT of different terms and metrics.

(Like “UR”, “Ahrefs Rank” and “CTLDs distribution”)

And, to be honest, Ahrefs doesn’t do a great job of explaining what these things mean in plain English.

For example, they describe Domain Rating as: “the target URL’s backlink profile on a 100-point logarithmic scale (higher = stronger).”

Huh?

So before we get into all of Ahrefs’ key features, it’s important to learn how to “speak Ahrefs”. I’ll also translate any technical stuff into easy-to-understand terms.

Common Ahrefs Terms

Here’s a breakdown of the terms that you’ll run into as you use Ahrefs.

URL Rating (UR): The link authority that a webpage has. Calculated as a combination of the quality and quantity of backlinks that point to that page.

Domain Rating (DR): URL Rating applied across an entire site (this is basically the equivalent of Moz Domain Authority).

Anchors: A breakdown of the most commonly-used anchor text in a site’s link profile.

Referring Domains: The number of different unique websites that link to the page or site you’re looking at. A high amount of referring domains correlates with higher rankings in Google.

CTLDs Distribution: A breakdown of a site’s links by top level domain (.com, .edu. .de etc.)

Ahrefs Rank: A worldwide ranking of a site’s link profile. Like with Alexa ranking, the lower the number, the better the link profile.

Parent Topic: The broad topic that a keyword falls under (for example, “link building” falls under the Parent Topic “SEO”).

Traffic Potential: The amount of traffic you’d get if you ranked in the #1 spot for that keyword.

Keyword Difficulty: How hard (or easy) it will be to rank on the first page of Google for a given keyword.

Also Rank For: A list of keywords that the top 10 results also rank for (for example, pages that rank for “content marketing” might also rank for “what is content marketing”).

With that out of the way, let’s get into the features!

Backlink Profile

To look at a site (or page’s) links, just pop a homepage or page URL into “Site Explorer”:

Ahrefs – Site explorer – Backlinko

And you’ll get a dashboard with info on that site’s backlinks, metrics and organic traffic.

Ahrefs – Site explorer – Dashboard

(More on that later)

To deep dive into that site’s link profile, hit “Backlinks” in the sidebar.

Ahrefs – Site explorer – Backlinks menu

And you’ll get a full list.

Ahrefs – Site explorer – Backlinks

If a site has a ton of backlinks, I recommend going to “Link type” → “Dofollow”.

Ahrefs – Site explorer – Dofollow filter

That way, you don’t have to sift through tons of semi-worthless nofollow links.

For example, my site has 196,849 backlinks.

Ahrefs – Backlinko backlinks

But if you only look at dofollow links, that number drops to 163,629.

Ahrefs – Backlinko dofollow backlinks

Still a lot of links. But it’s a lot easier to manage.

I usually also hit the “One link per domain” or “Group similar links” button here.

Ahrefs – Site explorer – Filters

That’s because, most of the time, you don’t want or need to see every single link a site has. It’s more to get a general idea of WHO links to that site and why they link to it.

And when you add the “One link per domain” or “Group similar links” filters, you get that information… without having to sift through as much noise.

So:

Now that you have a complete list of a site’s dofollow backlinks, what can you do with this information?

What You Can Do With This Report

Here are the two main things you can do with the Ahrefs backlinks report.


1. You can find pages that link to your competitor… and that might also link to you.

For example, when I looked at the links pointing to Ahrefs.com, I found this page:

Smashing Magazine – Technical SEO article

And when I look at the page, I can see that it links out to lots of different websites:

Smashing Magazine – Article links

(Specifically, websites that write about technical SEO)

So if I had an article on my site about technical SEO, I’d want to pitch my post to the person that runs the page.

Rinse and repeat this process until you’ve gone through your competitor’s entire link profile.


2. You can use their link profile to get an idea of WHY people link to that site.

For example, let’s look at Moz’s link profile:

Ahrefs – Moz backlinks

I notice right away that a good chunk of their links point to studies that they’ve published on the Moz blog:

Moz backlinks to studies

So if I wanted to get links from these same sites (which I do), I just learned that original data and research is a great way to do it.

Now that you’ve seen a site’s overall link profile, it’s time to start digging deeper into the data using some pretty cool Ahrefs features.

“Link Intersect”

This is an awesome feature that not that many people know about.

Here’s how it works:

In the top navigation hit “More” → “Link Intersect”.

Ahrefs – Link intersect – Menu

Then, put two or more competing sites into the fields:

Ahrefs – Link intersect – Input sites

And voila! You get a list of sites that are linking to all of the sites you put in.

Ahrefs – Link intersect – Results

Why is this helpful?

Well, if someone links to one of your competitors, it doesn’t tell you much. It could be because they have a relationship with that particular site. Or maybe they got lucky.

But if a site links to THREE of your competitors (and not you), this shows that they have a tendency to link to websites in your niche.

And if you use the same approach that your competitor’s used to get their links, they might be willing to link to you too.

Best By Links

“Best by links” = pages on a site that have the most backlinks.

And I can tell you from experience that this is one of the BEST features in Ahrefs’ entire toolkit.

I’ll explain with an example.

A few years ago, I put Moz into Ahrefs and looked at the “Best By Links” report.

Ahrefs – Best by links – Moz

And I saw something that shocked me.

A good chunk of Moz’s most linked-to pages were huge ultimate guides.

In fact, their 2nd most authoritative page is their Beginner’s Guide to SEO.

Moz – Beginners guide to SEO

This page had more links than their free SEO tools, their popular blog… and tons of other pages that I thought would have more links.

In fact, this single page has 114K backlinks.

Moz – Beginners guide to SEO – Backlinks

(That’s more than most entire websites have).

That’s when I realized: “I need to publish more definitive guides!”

And a few months later, I published my first big guide: “The Definitive Guide to Keyword Research”.

Backlinko – Keyword research guide

And it was a huge hit!

To date, this guide has 4.45K backlinks from 1.47K domains:

Keyword research guide – Backlinks and referring domains

In fact, a lot of the sites that linked to Moz’s guide now also link to my keyword research guide:

Ahrefs – Link intersect – Moz vs Backlinko

This approach works so well that I’ve started to double down on definitive guides.

Backlinko – Definitive guides

Which is one of the main reasons that our organic traffic has grown by 19.92% over the last 8 months.

Backlinko – Traffic increase

And it all started from the insight that I got from the “Best by links” report.

“New” Backlinks

This feature gives you a list of sites that just linked to your site (or a competitor’s site).

Ahrefs – New backlinks

Why is this helpful?

Because it shows you link building opportunities that are working right now.

For example, here’s an old backlink to my site:

Backlinko – Old backlink

I got that link 5+ years ago. You MIGHT be able to also get a link from that page.

But as time passes, it’s less and less likely that person is going to go back to an old page and add a link. Plus, SEO techniques change all the time. Specifically, strategies get overused and no longer work.

Which means that it’s entirely possible that the approach I used to build that link no longer works.

On the other hand, here’s a link that’s only a month old:

Kyliesaunder – Backlinko backlink

The person that wrote that new article is going to be MUCH more receptive to adding your link vs. someone that published something 5+ years ago.

Bottom line? “New” backlinks can help you identify fresh link building opportunities that you can tap into right away. They also help you see what’s working best in terms of link building right now.

“Lost” Backlinks

Lost backlinks is just like it sounds:

You get a list of pages that used to link to you… but recently removed your link.

Ahrefs – Lost backlinks

This is helpful for “Link Reclamation”… or getting lost links back.

For example, I recently lost this link:

Cision growth hack article backlink

Well, if I can find out why that person removed my link, I can sometimes get that link back.

That said: it’s normal to lose links. Sometimes scraper sites will delete a page. Or someone will update a post and remove your link because it’s no longer relevant. The idea here isn’t to obsess over lost links. Instead, use this as a way to get legitimate lost links back.

Note: Sometimes Ahrefs will show “link removed” even though the link is still there. So make sure to look at the page to confirm that your link was actually removed.

Chapter 4: Keywords Explorer

Keywords Explorer

Keywords Explorer is Ahrefs’ keyword research tool.

And it’s legit.

Why?

Because it gives you INSANE amounts of data on each keyword.

It’s like putting a magnifying glass (or a microscope) over a given keyword.

And in this chapter I’ll show you how to use Ahrefs for keyword research.

Keyword Overview

When you enter a keyword into Keywords Explorer, you’ll notice a bunch of cards above the fold:

Ahrefs – Keywords explorer – Overview

This is the “Overview” section that gives you a high-level overview of the term that you just searched for.

If you’ve ever used a keyword tool before, most of this stuff (like search volume and keyword competition) should be familiar to you.

Keyword difficulty and search volume

This overview is helpful when choosing a keyword for SEO… or quickly deciding between two different keywords.

But what makes Keywords Explorer unique is that you get to also see a keyword’s “Return Rate” (how often people search for a keyword more than once):

Ahrefs – Search volume – Return rate

Number of clicks:

Ahrefs – Number of clicks

Percentage of people that click on paid vs. organic results:

Ahrefs – Paid vs organic clicks

And “Clicks per search”:

Ahrefs – Search volume – Clicks per search

Why is this stuff important?

Or, put another way: what’s wrong with just looking at a keyword’s search volume?

Here’s the explanation:

As you’ve probably noticed, Google has been adding more SERP features to the results every year.

Things like Featured Snippets, “People also ask…” boxes, additional ads, video carousels, and more.

Thanks largely to these new SERP features, according to Sparktoro, “no-click searches” are up significantly compared to last year.